research

Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarship Winners to Pursue Knowledge Across the Globe

Education Abroad at UK (EA) and the Office of Undergraduate Research (UGR) awarded the three UK students with an Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarship (UGRAS) to support their international independent research projects during the summer session.

Choose Your Own Adventure: Camille Westmont, Jacob Welch, and Jordan Neumann

University of Kentucky students Camille Westmont, Jacob Welch, and Jordan Neumann each have their own story but shared between them is the common thread of Anthropology. Within the major there are four subfields of study: archaeological, biological and cultural anthropology, taught in the Anthropology Department; and linguistics, taught in the Linguistics Program

This diversity gives the Department of Anthropology's students room to explore their varied interests and choose their own academic adventures. 
 
Such was the case with Camille Westmont and Jacob Welch, who found their calling in the sub-discipline of archeology and the Yucatan peninsula. Meanwhile, for Jordan Neumann, it was cultural anthropology and all things Tibet that he found himself drawn towards. 
 
Equally present in each of these students' stories is the Department of Anthropology's faculty and staff who are always ready and willing to help students find their way.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Honors Students Present Research at Kentucky Honors Roundtable

The Kentucky Honors Roundtable allows undergraduate students to present their research projects, serve on academic panels and interact with academically excelling students from other Kentucky institutions. This year the conference hosted approximately 60 presentations, spanning over a range of diverse topics.

The End of Wonder in the Age of Whatever

Dr. Michael Wesch, a cultural anthropologist and media ecologist at Kansas State University, will be giving a talk entitled "The End of Wonder in the Age of Whatever" presented by the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELT). Dr. Wesch regularly teaches large classes and was the 2008 U.S. Professor of the Year for Doctoral and Research Universities selected by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 
 
He will be talking about creating a sense of "wonder" in the classroom and giving students the gift of "big questions." Professor Wesch's visit strives to inspire UK faculty and foster a dialogue on campus around topics such as teaching large classes and using new media and technologies in the classroom to nurture student curiosity and exploration as they pursue authentic and relevant questions. 
 

New media and technology present us with an overwhelming bounty of tools for connection, creativity, collaboration, and knowledge creation - a true "Age of Whatever" where anything seems possible. But any enthusiasm about these remarkable possibilities is immediately tempered by that other "Age of Whatever" - an age in which people feel increasingly disconnected, disempowered, tuned out, and alienated. Such problems are especially prevalent in education, where the Internet often enters our classrooms as a distraction device rather than a tool for learning.

What is needed more than ever is to inspire our students to wonder, to nurture their appetite for curiosity, exploration, and contemplation. It is our responsibility to help them attain an insatiable appetite and pursue big, authentic, and relevant questions so that they can harness and leverage the bounty of possibility, rediscover the "end" or purpose of wonder, and stave off the historical end of wonder.

Date: 
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
WT Young Auditorium
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Cosmos and Computers: Gary Ferland discusses infrastructure upgrades for studying space.

The University of Kentucky recently announced big upgrades to its supercomputing infrastructure. This means more power for researchers across the campus working on some of the questions that have puzzled us the longest. 

One such researcher is Professor Gary Ferland of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Since the late 1970s, he’s been using computer modeling software to carry out experiments that would otherwise be impossible. With his widely used program Cloudy which simulates clouds of interstellar matter out in space and UK’s high-tech supercomputing infrastructure, Ferland and his students have been able to help answer some of the biggest questions facing astronomers as well as society.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Unearthing Roman Secrets: an interview with George Crothers and Paolo Visona

Dripsinum is the name of a place that isn't on any modern map - but, according to recent research, should be on the maps of the ancient Roman Empire. Archaeologists George Crothers and Paolo Visona returned from Italy this summer with data that indicates the whereabouts of the lost Roman settlement, said to be half the size of Pompeii - and another, older site below that!

Though written about in antiquity by medieval scholars and even Pliny the Elder, the features of the ancient city have only recently come to light: with the assistance of magnetic and radar images taken by Crothers and his team. In this podcast, the features of the site are described by Visona and Crothers, as well as the historical and cultural significance of these discoveries. 

The trip was sponsored by a Research Support Grant from the Office of the Vice President for Research, and supported by the City of Arzignano, Italy. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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