anthropology

UK Education Abroad Expands Opportunities in Mexico

With offerings from anthropology to WRD, UK Education Abroad is working to help more students study in Mexico.

NY Times Article Features Udvardy's Work Facilitating Return of Kenyan Artifacts

Decades after their removal from Kenya, American museums are working to return memorial totems, known as vigango.

AGSA DISTINGUISHED LECTURE

Sponsor: Anthro Graduate Student Association

Dr. Theodore Bestor, Professor of Social Anthropology, Harvard U.  Director, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.  

Research Interests: Food systems and culture; the global fishing industry; the impact of the March 11 earthquake, tsunami, and radiation disasters on Japanese society as a whole; urban environments and infrastructures; Japan, East Asia, North Atlantic.  Book:  Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World (University of California, 2004).

Date: 
Friday, March 28, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
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Maureen Meyers Wins C. B. Moore Award

The C. B. Moore Award, given annually at the Southeastern Archaeological Conference in recognition of “Excellence in Southeastern Archaeology or associated studies by a distinguished younger “scholar”, was established by the members of the Lower Mississippi Survey in 1990.

Anthropology's Sarah Lyon Selected to Edit Preeminent Journal

Sarah Lyon, University of Kentucky associate professor of anthropology, has been selected as the editor-designate of Human Organization, the flagship journal of the Society for Applied Anthropology.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 2

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 3

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 1

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Ready To Represent: UK will be in full force at the 37th Annual National Women's Studies Association Conference

90 miles to the north of Lexington on the banks of the Ohio River is the “The Queen City.” The nickname itself could probably be the topic of a panel discussion when the 37th annual meeting of the National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA) rolls into town in early November.

Anthropologists Chris Pool and Mickey Loughlin Receive a Multi-Year Grant from the National Science Foundation to Study Ancient Mesoamerican History

Archaeologists Christopher Pool and Michael Loughlin have spent many summers in southern Veracruz working to learn more about ancient Mesoamericans.

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