anthropology

Becoming Farmer, Becoming Workers: Agriculture and Industrial Gold Mining in Papua New Guinea.

Comparing ethnographic and agricultural data collected from two neighboring Biangai villages (Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea), one engaged in a small-scale conservation effort and the other stakeholders in a large industrial gold mine, this paper analyzes the linkages between alternative development regimes, agricultural transformation and human-environmental relations. Working the land is not simply about production, but also about knowing the landscape and its products as nodes in human social relations. Mining regimes disentangle the multi-species networks experienced in the garden, and reassemble them into other spaces. Thus, in the mining inspired transformations of agricultural practices, Biangai are also transforming how they experience their own multi-species community – its past, present and future.

 

Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology Colloquium Series.

Date: 
Friday, April 22, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Rm. 102, Whitehall Classroom Bldg.
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Moving Mountains and Liberating Dialogues: My Life as a Black Feminist Archaeologist

The works of African descendant women describing our own experiences has always been the most reliable source for my developing a coherent theoretical dialogue about women in captivity and beyond. Black Feminist Archaeology, therefore, demonstrates through an analysis of the material past a method to positively enhance the texture and depth of how we understand the experiences of captive African peoples and further creates an archaeology that can be directly linked to the larger quest for social and political justice.

Date: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Bldg Rm. 102
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Peachy-Keen: Tracing the Introduction of Peaches (Prunus persica) into the Americas

This talk demonstrates how plant remains can be used to trace food pathways in the modern day. The plant is peaches and the talk will examine pits recovered from a Mission period archaeological site located on Sapelo Island, one of the Georgia Sea Islands, where UK Dept of Anthropology archaeologist Dr. R. Jefferies is conducting excavations and research.

Date: 
Friday, February 19, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm. 102
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Year of Europe: Intersections of Violence in Latin America, Panel Discussion

As the third session in The Intersections of Violence in Latin America, three distinguished scholars speak about their work on violence:

Rosa Linda Fregoso is a professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her areas of specialization are femenicide, gender and racial violence, media and visual arts, and cultural politics in the Americas. Her publications include many single authored and co-edited volumes such as Terrorizing Women: Femenicide in the Americas, MeXicana Encounters: The Making of Social Identities on the Borderlands, and The Bronze Screen: Chicana and Chicano Film Culture. Cecilia Menjivar is currently a foundation distinguished professor in the department of sociology at the University of Kansas. She specializes in immigration, gender, violence, social networks, and religious institutions in the US and Latin America (particularly Central America). She has written over 90 articles and book chapters as well as six books, including Enduring Violence: Ladina Women’s Lives in Guatemala and Fragmented Ties: Salvadoran Immigrant Networks in America, both of which have received numerous awards. She is also currently the Vice President of the American Sociological Association.

Tiffiny Tung is the Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of Graduate Studies in Anthropology at Vanderbilt University. She is the director of the Beringa Bioarchaeology and Archaeology Project in the Majes Valley in Arequipa, Peru. Her areas of specialization include paleopathology, violence related trauma, the use of body and body parts in rituals, bioarchaeology of imperialism, and bioarchaeological perspectives on embodiment. Her book is called Violence, Ritual, and the Wari Empire: A Social Bioarchaeology of Imperialism in the Ancient Andes.

Researchers 'Open for Collaboration' Through UK Libraries

Open Access is a consistent theme in university libraries across the world, as researchers seek to share and collaborate in new ways.

The Committee on Social Theory Presents: Dr. Mahmood Mamdani

 

 

The Committee on Social Theory at The University of Kentucky is hosting Professor Mahmood Mamdani as its Fall Distinguished Speaker. On October 2, Dr. Mamdani will give a talk entitled “Political Violence and Political Justice: A Critique of Criminal Justice as Accountability.” The talk will take place at 3:30 pm in the W.T. Young Library Auditorium.

Dr. Mamdani is a Professor of Anthropology, Political Science and African Studies at Columbia University. He is also the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government at Columbia University’s School of Internal Affairs. Additionally, he is the Director of the Makerere Institute of Social Research in Kampala, Uganda.

A native of Uganda, Dr. Mamdani was awarded one of 26 scholarships to study in the United States when Uganda won its independence. After graduating from the University of Pittsburgh, Mamdani joined the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1972. While conducting dissertation research in Uganda he was expelled by Idi Amin. After the overthrow of Amin, Mamdani returned to Uganda, but his citizenship was eventually revoked as a result of his scholarship’s criticism of the government. During his career Mamdani has been visiting professor at the University of Michigan, University of Durban-Westville, the Nuhru Memorial Museum and Library, and Princeton University. He was also the inaugural chair of African studies at the University of Cape Town.

Professor Mamdani’s current work explores the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and the history and theory of human rights. His most recent book, Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror (2009), investigates how conflict in Darfur began as a civil war and transformed into a War on Terror.

 

 

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