Anthropology Events

Colonial Epistemology and the Transformation of Inca Culture

Date: 
Tuesday, February 7, 2017 - 3:30pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery, Fine Arts Library

Not What the Doctor Ordered: Tobacco Farming’s Effects on Sociality and Ecology of Two Sympatric Lemur Species

Date: 
Friday, December 2, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Classroom Building 114
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Dr. Freed will discuss recent research on Lemus in Madagascar. Dr. Freed is a biological anthropologist and assistant professor in the Anthropology Department at Eastern Kentucky University.

Reconstructing Anthropogenic Landscapes with Drone-mounted Sensors

Date: 
Friday, October 28, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
White Hall CB 114
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Meinarti: the 1500 year history of a Nubian village told by stratigraphy

Date: 
Friday, September 23, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:45pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Room 108
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Meinarti wine press

Tips for NSF proposals in the Social Sciences

Date: 
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
18th Floor, Patterson Office Tower
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Dr. Jeffrey Mantz will go through the basics of NSF applications, talk about specific programs, and give some general grant writing advice. Mantz is Program Director in Cultural Anthropology and Human Subjects Research Officer at the National Science Foundation, where he has served since 2012. He holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Chicago and has previously taught at George Mason University, Cornell University, California State University at Stanislaus, and Vassar College. His own research takes him to the Caribbean and Central Africa, where he explores issues related to inequality, resource extraction, and commodity supply chains.

Becoming Farmer, Becoming Workers: Agriculture and Industrial Gold Mining in Papua New Guinea

Date: 
Friday, April 22, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm 102
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Comparing ethnographic and agricultural data collected from two neighboring Biangai villages (Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea), one engaged in a small-scale conservation effort and the other stakeholders in a large industrial gold mine, this paper analyzes the linkages between alternative development regimes, agricultural transformation and human-environmental relations. Working the land is not simply about production, but also about knowing the landscape and its products as nodes in human social relations. Mining regimes disentangle the multi-species networks experienced in the garden, and reassemble them into other spaces. Thus, in the mining inspired transformations of agricultural practices, Biangai are also transforming how they experience their own multi-species community – its past, present and future.

Dr. Jamon Halvaksz is Associate Professor of Anthropology at University of Texas San Antonio, and a 1994 graduate of our very own department. http://colfa.utsa.edu/ant/people/full-time-faculty/bios/jamon-a-halvaksz-ii/. 

Moving Mountains and Liberating Dialogues: My Life as a Black Feminist Archaeologist

Date: 
Thursday, March 24, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm 102
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What Does Innocence Have to do with Justice?”

Date: 
Friday, February 26, 2016 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Young Library Auditorium
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Dr. Miriam Ticktin. Associate Professor of Anthropology and Co-Director of Zolberg Center on Global Migration, the New School.  This talk is part of the Committee on Social Theory Spring Lecture Series.  http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/faculty/?id=4d54-6379-4e44-4d35

Peachy-Keen: Tracing the Introduction of Peaches (Prunus persica) into the Americas

Date: 
Friday, February 19, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm 102
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