Anthropology Events

Shaking the Family Tree (again): What Do We Really Know About Our Newest Cousin, Homo naledi?

Date: 
Friday, January 29, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm 118
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Shaking the Family Tree (again): What Do We Really Know About Our Newest Cousin, Homo naledi?

Date: 
Friday, January 29, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm 118
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Trails and Tribulations: Chatino Conceptions of the Dead

Date: 
Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery (Fine Arts Library)
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Out of Many…: Hinterland Perspectives on the Creation of an Ancient Maya Polity

Date: 
Friday, January 22, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm 102
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TBD

Date: 
Friday, October 2, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Classroom Building Rm 102
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Since 1996, Dr. Hutson has been doing archaeology in the Maya area, working briefly in Belize and Guatemala before settling down in Yucatan, Mexico, in 1998.  Dr. Hutson will speak about his current research.

TBD

Date: 
Friday, September 25, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Classroom Building Rm 102
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Mexican social scientist, Josefina Aranda Beauzry (from ISS-UABJO), will teach a one credit course on gender, development, and food in Latin America at UK in F15.  She joins us from Instituto de Investigaciones Sociológicas-Universidad Autonoma "Benito Juarez" de Oaxaca, Mexico, and will give a public lecture in conjunction with her visit. 

Coffee Quality and Qualities: Closing the Gender Asset Gap in Oaxaca, Mexico

Date: 
Friday, September 11, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Classroom Building Rm 102
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Women farmers are less likely to own land and have limited access to credit, extension services, producer organizations and market information.  In this talk, Sarah Lyon explores current innovations in the speciality, high-quality, coffee market aimed at supporting women farmers, including new financial products and training programs, micro-batching of women's coffee, identifying and supporting "hidden influences" and developing gender "scorecards."  She will discuss the impact of some of these innovations in Oaxaca, Mexico, where 42 % of registered organic coffee farmers are now women.

May Day Reflections on Aluminum Workers in Indiana

Date: 
Friday, May 1, 2015 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 213
Tags/Keywords:
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Handbook for Preliminary Dissertation Fieldwork: A Practical Guide for the International Student Researcher

Date: 
Friday, April 24, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 213
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With support from a Susan Abbott-Jamieson Award, Kevin Talbert spent Summer, 2013, conducting preliminary fieldwork in Tanzania.  This practicum report is designed to be a handbook for any Anthropology graduate students conducting field research abroad, but It will be of interest to graduate students and other researchers conducting field research, especially internationally, for the first time.  The presentation covers such topics as entering the field, locating an appropriate field site, seeking local institutional affiliations, the research permit process, etc.  This roundtable is designed to be useful for anyone seeking to embark on first fieldwork, not just in Africa but elsewhere as well.  It focuses especially on the preliminary fieldwork stage in preparation for a longer, PhD fieldwork length immersion later. 

Women and Peacebuilding: Lessons Learned from Post-Genocide Rwanda

Date: 
Friday, April 17, 2015 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Rm 213 Lafferty Hall
Type of Event (for grouping events):
  • Dr. Jennie Burnet, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, University of Louisville, received the 2013 Elliot Skinner Award from the Association of Africanist Anthropology for her book, “Genocide Lives in Us: Women, Memory, and Silence in Rwanda,” (Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2012). The association described the book as “an outstanding piece of research and writing (that) makes a great contribution to anthropology, African studies, gender and the treatment of violence.” Her research interests center on Rwanda, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, East Africa, and the United States, where she examines structure, agency, and human subjectivity and such topics as race; ethnicity; gender and sexuality; violence, genocide, and peace; and development studies. (Dr. Monica Udvardy is contactperson)

Migration, Skill and the Transformation of Social Networks in the Late Prehispanic Southwest

Date: 
Friday, April 10, 2015 - 5:15pm to 6:45pm
Location: 
Student Center Rm 230
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Applied Anthropology Roundtable Spring 2015

Date: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Workshop on Networking and Making the Most out of Conferences (co-organized with AGSA)

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