Anthropology Events

Global Uttarakhand: Development, Neoliberalism and Social Justice in Himalayan India

Date: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery
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The UK Appalachian Center welcomes Dr. Rebecca Klenk from the University of Tennessee Knoxville.  She will be giving a talk entitled Global Uttarakhand: Development, Neoliberalism and Social Justice in Himalayan India as a part of our Appalachian Forum Series on Civil Rights, Labor and Environmental Social Movements in Appalachia.  Her talk will be held in the Niles Gallery from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on Monday, March 9, 2015.  A reception will follow at the UK Appalachian Center from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Coffee Quality and Qualities: Closing the Gender Asset Gap in Oaxaca, Mexico

Date: 
Friday, March 6, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Rm 213 Lafferty Hall
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Dr. Lyon’s work is situated at the juncture of development studies, economic anthropology and food studies. She is particularly interested in how alternative food networks such as fair trade work to create and sustain diverse economies in the United States and Latin America.

Disrupting Life/Not Life: A Feminist-Indigenous Reading of Interspecies Relations and the New Materialisms

Date: 
Saturday, February 28, 2015 - 5:15pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Memorial Hall
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Dr. Kim TallBear is Associate Professor of Anthropology at University of Texas at Austin and a Fellow of James Voss-Texas Instruments Regents Professorship in Australian Studies.  Sponsored by the UK Political Ecology Working Group (DOPE), this talk begins with a critical reading of a particular set of human-on-human relations—those involved when scientists (disproportionately white Western men) sample indigenous peoples in the course of human genome research. Many of the bio-specimens in circulation today were taken from indigenous peoples’ bodies during earlier ethical and racial regimes. New bioethical responses are afoot. But when they emerge from non-indigenous institutions and philosophical terrain they cannot fully address indigenous peoples’ interpretations and ethical needs. I propose that indigenous responses to genome technologies and practices can be more fully understood not simply by recourse to “bioethics,” but also by weaving together the approaches of indigenous thinkers historically with newer thinking in indigenous studies, feminist science studies, political ecology, critical animal studies, and the new materialisms. This talk weaves into conversation diverse intellectual threads in order to help us understand how the lines between life and not life, materiality and the “sacred” are not so easily drawn for some indigenous peoples. This implicates how we approach from an indigenous standpoint the ethics of the preservation and new use of old biological samples. More fundamentally, this talk interrogates the underlying concept of “preservation” that emerges from non-indigenous institutions in the form of technological and policy practices. Such practices compartmentalize indigenous history, bodies, and landscapes into a historical before and after that undercuts the very idea of indigenous peoples and landscapes as fully alive today.

"The Cowboy and the Goddess: News Myth-making about Immigrants."

Date: 
Friday, February 27, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
Lexmark Public Room
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Held in conjunction with ST 600 "Transnational Lives," Dr. Otto Santa Ana is the second lecturer in the Committee on Social Theory Spring Lecture Series. Professor Otto Santa Ana’s scholarship over the past 15 years focuses on language that constructs social hierarchies and on how mass media amplifies the construction of unjust social inequity. His first book, Brown Tide Rising (2002) provides a close study of newspapers and mass media representations of Latinos. The American Political Science Association named it Book of the Year on Ethnic and Racial Political Ideology. He continues to refine his research tools (and with undergraduate co-authors), recently explored the national newspaper coverage of immigrants during the Great Immigrant Rights Marches of 2006. This article, “A May to Remember” appeared in the Du Bois Review (2007).

“Perspectives On Nations Unbound: The Transnational Paradigm in the Current Conjecture”

Date: 
Friday, February 6, 2015 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
18th Floor of Patterson Office Tower
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Held in conjunction with ST 600, "Transnational Lives," Dr. Glick Schiller is the first lecturer in the Commitee on Social Theory Spring Lecture Series. 

Third Wave Coffee, Maya Farmers, and the Anthropology of Wellbeing

Date: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 3:00pm
Location: 
Patterson Office Tower 18th floor West End Room
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His talk focuses on specialty coffee markets and Maya farmers in Guatemala. The best coffees these days are selling for astronomical prices and even though farmers are not getting rich, they are benefitting from the market boom and have high hopes for coffee. 

Third Wave Coffee, Maya Farmers, and the Anthropology of Wellbeing

Date: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
POT 18th floor
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Tikal: Paleoecology of an Ancient Maya City

Date: 
Friday, January 16, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Rm 213 Lafferty Hall
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Archaeology Roundtable: Undergraduate Student Presentations

Date: 
Friday, November 21, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 108
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Archaeology Roundtable: Undergraduate Student Presentations

Date: 
Friday, November 21, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 108
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Archaeology Roundtable: Undergraduate Student Presentations

Date: 
Friday, November 21, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 108
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Archaeology Roundtable: Anthropology Undergraduate Student Presentations

Date: 
Friday, November 21, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 108
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